Citizens divided on investing in job training programs – 202 participants

Aug 03, 2017

With one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country, New Hampshire has a shortage of workers in several fields, particularly in health care and technology. Read more about this issue. On August 3, Citizens Count, NH’s Live Free or Die Alliance decided to put the issue to its Facebook members, posting the question, “Should NH invest more state funds in training programs for fields with a shortage of workers?”

“Should NH invest more state funds in training programs for fields with a shortage of workers?”

Results: Yes or No Respondents

Job Training Funding NH Citizen Voices Chart

Participation: 202 participants gave 396 responses

A total of 89% of those participating gave a ‘yes or no’ response to the question. The remaining 11% of participants engaged in the discussion but did not give a ‘yes or no’ response. In total, 202 individuals from New Hampshire contributed a total of 396 responses or reactions to this question. (Click here for details on our methodology.)

What Participants Said:

No: A slight majority of ‘yes or no’ respondents, at 53%, were opposed to investing more state funds in training programs for fields with a shortage of workers.

  • “There is a shortage of workers in every field. Do more trades training in high school as an alternative.”
  • “So much money is spent and wasted on these types of programs. Hardly anyone who goes through the programs ends up getting a job anywhere near what they get trained for.”
  • “Private business can apprentice if they want to reap the rewards. No need for tax money to be spent.”

Yes: A minority of ‘yes or no’ respondents, at 47%, were in favor of investing more state funds in training programs for fields with a shortage of workers.

  • “If you want to reduce social expenditures, this is the way to do it.  A better educated community is better for us all.”
  • “This investment is well worth the effort and the funds… Good things happen to the economy when you lift people out of poverty.”
  • “Put some requirements in the program to make sure those who participate are seriously looking for a chance at a better job and give them a hand up.”

Other: As noted above, 11% of those participating did not give a ‘yes or no’ response, instead addressing their comments to related questions and issues. These included:  

  • Priorities in education: “Elementary schools need to hire actual math and science teachers to teach those subjects to kids starting by grade three.”
  • Higher education: “Maybe if the community colleges in NH were reasonable more people would become educated.”
  • The trades: “Not everything is repairable with a keyboard. [It] takes those who are not afraid of getting their hands dirty to make it work.”

*Editor selection of actual participant quotes. 

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