Allow landlords to double security deposits?

Mar 09, 2018

BY: CCNH-LFDA Highlights

Next week the New Hampshire House will vote on a bill that would allow landlords to ask for two months’ rent for a security deposit.

Current law only allows landlords to ask for one month’s rent.

Click here to learn more about the debate over landlord and tenant rights in New Hampshire.

Bill supporters argue that one month’s rent is often not enough to cover damage to a property, so landlords are charging higher rents to cover losses.

Other bill supporters argue that allowing landlords to collect two months’ rent in a security deposit will make them more likely to take a risk on renters with bad credit.

Opponents of the bill argue that letting landlords double security deposits will make it even harder for renters to find housing in New Hampshire. Homeless advocates and local welfare officials therefore oppose the bill.

The House killed a similar bill in 2015.

Do you support allowing landlords to collect first and last months’ rent as a security deposit? Let us know in the comments below.

Comments

Mark Belonga
- Nashua

Sun, 03/11/2018 - 1:57am

The article stated that one month rent for security deposit isn't enough to cover potential damage to properties so landlord charge higher rent to cover damage. Using this argument what would stop landlords from continuing to charge higher rent even if they get two months rent down as a security deposit. To me that's even more money they can try to keep by claiming bogus damage done to the property. I've seen a landlord try saying a tenant damaged a door because it wouldn't close, even though it was evident that the reason was that the house was old and had settled to the point that the door frame had realigned keeping the door from closing. I've had a landlord try charging me for a new screen door even though my door wasn't broken. The reasoning behind it was because the neighbors door was broken and she wanted them to match. One month is fine. Most tenants take care of their apartments and normal wear and tear is not covered unde r the security deposit.

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