Medicinal Marijuana

LFDA Editor

On July 23, 2013, Gov. Maggie Hassan made New Hampshire the 19th state to legalize medicinal marijuana. 

She signed the House and Senate passed HB 573 in 2013. Under the bill, four alternative treatment centers will be licensed by the state to dispense marijuana to qualifying patients. 

Cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, Hepatitis C, ALS, muscular dystrophy, Crohn's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic pancreatitis, spinal cord injury or disease, and traumatic brain injury are some of the qualifying conditions.

The original version of the bill permitted marijuana cultivation by patients, but concerns over law enforcement led to the provisions removal.

In signing the bill, Hassan said: "Allowing doctors to provide relief to patients through the use of appropriately regulated and dispensed medical marijuana is the compassionate and right policy for the State of New Hampshire."

The treatment centers are expected to open in 2016. Locations have been proposed in Plymouth, Dover, Lebanon and Merrimack, but have not yet received final approval. 

Proponents of medical marijuana argue that it can be a safe and effective treatment for the symptoms of terminal illness and chronic diseases. The American College of Physicians, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association are some of the major health organizations to support the medicinal value of marijuana.

Opponents argue that marijuana is an addictive, non-FDA approved drug that adversely affects the lungs, immune system, and brain.

According to 2013 WMUR Granite State poll, 79% of New Hampshire residents support a medicinal marijuana law (57% strongly and 22% somewhat).

Eighteen other states and the District of Columbia have enacted medicinal marijuana laws.

PROS & CONS

"For" Position

By LFDA Editor

Proponents of medical marijuana argue that it can be a safe and effective treatment for the symptoms of terminal illness and chronic diseases. The American College of Physicians, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association are some of the major health organizations to support the medicinal value of marijuana.

"Against" Position

By LFDA Editor

Opponents argue that marijuana is an addictive, non-FDA approved drug that adversely affects the lungs, immune system, and brain.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

In Committee

Modifies the requirements for criminal background checks of medical marijuana dispensary employees, allows providers in neighboring states to prescribe medical marijuana, and changes the amount of marijuana dispensaries may have on location.

In Committee

Adds post-traumatic stress disorder to the qualifying medical conditions under the medical marijuana law.

In Committee

Adds ulcerative colitis to the list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana.

In Committee

Allows two additional medical marijuana treatment centers.

In Committee

Allows the Department of Health and Human Services to authorize medical marijuana use for a medical condition that is not listed in the law on a "patient by patient" basis rather than "case by case" basis.

Killed in the House

Allows physician assistants to prescribe medicinal marijuana

Killed in the House

Requires the state to begin processing applications for medical marijuana ID cards no later than July 23, 2015

Killed in the House

Broadens the medical conditions that qualify for medicinal marijuana to include many general symptoms

Signed by Governor

Adds epilepsy, lupus, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease to the list of medical conditions qualifying for medicinal marijuana

Signed by Governor

Allows satellite marijuana dispensaries, and makes other small changes to the law governing medicinal marijuana

Signed by Governor

Requires a medicinal marijuana treatment centers to give payment in lieu of taxes to a municipality if the center's nonprofit status grants a property tax exemption

Interim Study

Permits qualifying patients and registered caregivers to grow medicinal marijuana at home

Tabled in the House

Protects certified public accountants from prosecution or penalty for providing services to medical marijuana treatment centers and patients

Signed by Governor

Creating deadlines for the criminal background check for caregivers. This bill also repeals the requirement that marijuana cultivation locations be confidential.

Interim Study

Allowing home-growing medicinal marijuana

Signed by Governor

Adding a member of the New Hampshire Association of Police Chiefs to the advisory council overseeing the implementation of the medicinal marijuana law

Interim Study

Adding epilepsy, lupus, and Parkinson's disease to the list of conditions qualifying for medicinal marijuana. This bill also requires medicinal marijuana to be in a locked container when in a car.

Killed in the House

Prohibiting advertising by medicinal marijuana treatment centers

Signed by Governor

Allowing medicinal use of marijuana without home growing

Vetoed by Governor

Authorizing medicinal marijuana

Vetoed by Governor

Legalizing medicinal marijuana

Should NH continue to allow medicinal marijuana?

FOR
REPRESENTATIVES

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UNDECIDED
REPRESENTATIVES

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AGAINST
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Comments

Barbara B
- Conway

Mon, 01/20/2014 - 9:16pm

I don't have any objections to the legalization of marijuana for medicinal purposes, although I do believe that for such, a prescription would be necessary in order to obtain it. It should also first be approved, like all other drugs do now, by a board within the health insurance industry, who oversees the legitimate use of prescription drugs. If a person isn't qualified to receive it, then the board would deny the authorization for its use, just as it currently does for any other prescription it approves or denies.

johns97's picture
John Sullivan
- Methuen

Wed, 06/27/2012 - 11:02pm

New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch is universally praised for his bipartisanship and his adroit navigation, as a Democrat, through a roiling sea of conservative lawmakers. That's probably why it's no surprise that, when it comes to medical marijuana, he can at once be so right and so wrong.

On June 21, Lynch carried through with his promised veto of Senate Bill 409, a measure to permit the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes in New Hampshire. For sticking by his word, and being willing to break ranks with a large portion of his lefty, 420-friendly base (not to mention defying the libertarian ethos among many Granite Staters), the governor is in the right.

Similarly, the governor is correct in worrying about a lack of oversight that would allow casual stoners, or even children, to avail themselves of cannabis meant for healing. As he says in his veto message, "SB 409 also authorizes marijuana use by minors under the age of 18. At a time of increased use of marijuana by minors across the country, I am very concerned that legislation allowing marijuana use by teenagers even for medical purposes will downplay the perceived risk of use of this drug and will lead to increased adolescent use in New Hampshire."

No question about it. Just as Ritalin and Adderall -- stimulants prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, particularly in young people -- circulate through a teenage underground for unprescribed, even recreational, purposes, "legitimate" marijuana will find its way into the wrong hands.

But, unlike marijuana, countless harmful narcotics, painkillers and amphetamines aren't made illegal because of the potential for illicit use. And that's where the governor finds his way to the wrong side of the issue.

As outlined in the Live Free or Die Alliance's issue page on medicinal marijuana, the American College of Physicians, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association are just some of the major health organizations attesting to the medicinal value of marijuana. And while the American Medical Association doesn't expressly endorse marijuana, it has urged the federal government to allow adequate and well-controlled studies of marijuana and related cannabinoids for a variety of patients.

With his veto (and the unlikelihood of predicted doom for an override in the state Senate), Gov. Lynch effectively ends the conversation, and the potential for important medical assistance, for at least another year. That's just wrong.

Thomas Kelley
- Newport

Mon, 10/13/2014 - 12:00am

Marijuana prohibition is a costly policy that has cost our country billions. The prohibition of medical marijuana is particularly unfair and unjust to victims of debilitating  diseases and medical conditions. Patients are forced to break the law and support a criminal subculture and criminal economy to obtain a medicine that could be bought legally for fair prices, or simply grown in their back yards.

Jamie Fintonis
- Epping

Sun, 08/23/2015 - 12:02pm

Its 2015.  We all know alcohol is so much more dangerous than cannabis.  Lets get real.

Thomas Kelley
- Newport

Sun, 08/23/2015 - 12:05pm

Number of alchohol related deaths per year : 88,000 Number of Cannabis related deaths:  0

      It seems that whether a politician accepts the lies and failings of cannabis prohibition is indicative of his  willingness to think and act independently. We are at a point now where partisan politics is not quite as tied to the issue of cannabis prohibition. People from both sides of the political spectrum are admitting federal cannabis policy is a costly failure.

        By the way, Senator Kelly Ayotte has come out against any federal decriminalization plans, taking the freedom choice away from the NH State control. The feds do not want to give up the billions invested in the DEA for cannabis law enforcement.

Jon
- Nashua

Tue, 03/31/2015 - 10:24am

We are coming up to the 2yr anniversary of nh passing the medical Marijuana bill and yet patients still have no access. What is taking so long?

BrianDunn's picture
Brian Dunn
- Henniker

Wed, 09/16/2015 - 4:52pm

We commonly accept opiods such as vicodin and oxycontin to be prescribed with no outcry and happily feed amphetamines such as adderall to our children, but people will shout at the top of their lungs to keep Marijuana illegal and out of society? Honestly people, how nieve are you? I bet you nearly every person who believes marijuana should be illegal is on some prescription drug (anti depressant, anti anxiety, sleep aid) which are scientifically stronger and more addictive than marijuana. If not this then I bet they consumes alcholol on a regular basis. Both of which are worse then marijuana itself. Wake up people, you are dumb.

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Issue Status

Click here for details on how to apply for a New Hampshire medical marijuana identification card. 

The state's first marijuana cultivation center, to be located in Rochester and operated by Sanctuary ATC, was approved by the DHHS. 

As a result of a 2015 lawsuit, the DHHS has begun issuing cards to qualifying medical marijuana patients, who may then purchase marijuana at legal dispensaries in other states. Cardholders may possess up to two ounces of legally-acquired cannabis.   

HB 1373 would create two more alternative treatment centers in the state. 

Other bills submitted for the 2016 session add qualifying medical conditions to state cannabis regulations, including post-traumatic stress disorder (HB 1309) and ulcerative colitis (HB 1453).

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